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Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious condition where your blood glucose level is too high.  There are two main types; type 1 and type 2.  They are different conditions, but they are both serious.
Over a long period of time, high glucose levels can seriously damage your eyes, your feet and your kidneys, but with the right treatment and care people can lead healthy lives.

NHS Kernow has commissioned a Video Library specifically about diabetes to support our patients.
They cover topics such as; looking after your feet, getting your eyes checked and preparing for pregnancy when you have diabetes.

 

Preventing Diabetes

1 in 15 people in the UK have diabetes.  Most of those people have type 2 diabetes and more than half of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or delayed by maintaining a healthy weight, eating well and being active.

There are many factors that may put you at risk of developing type 2 Diabetes, but taking action early can lower your risk of developing the condition and suffering complications.

Some patients have a blood sugar level which is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes.  Doctors may use terms such as pre-diabetes, borderline diabetes or non-diabetic hyperglycaemia to describe how serious it is to have higher than normal blood sugar levels.  It does not mean you have type 2 diabetes, but it means you are more at risk of getting it in the future

If you are found to be at risk, the good news is that for many people with pre-diabetes, diabetes can be delayed or prevented by increasing your physical activity, making changes to what you eat and by losing weight.

There is lots of support for people with pre-diabetes, including the Healthier You NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme.  Please see the links below.

Healthier you

Healthier You Programme - Patient leaflet

 

 

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